archaeology

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Dig Unearths Find That 'Has Nudged the Course of History'

Medieval grave held gold, jewels, and perhaps one of the first female early Christian leaders in Britain

(Newser) - On one of the last days of an otherwise unexciting 10-week dig in Britain's Northamptonshire in April, Levente-Bence Balazs spotted teeth. Then the dig leader saw gold. What Balazs, of the Museum of London Archaeology, suspected to be a rubbish pit was, in fact, a grave dating back 1,...

'Miracle' Tunnel Might Lead to Cleopatra's Tomb

Tunnel sits below Taposiris Magna temple in Egypt, possible site of royal tomb

(Newser) - Archaeologists hoping to find Cleopatra's lost tomb have instead discovered an incredible feat of engineering: a 6.5-foot-tall underground tunnel stretching for nearly a mile. The Egyptian Ministry of Tourism calls it a "geometric miracle," per Smithsonian . Kathleen Martinez of the University of San Domingo, whose team...

Oldest Sentence in Oldest Alphabet Names a Modern Scourge

The wealthiest ancients had a problem with head lice, too

(Newser) - The purpose of the ancient double-edged ivory comb unearthed in Israel is made clear by its inscription: "May this tusk root out the lice of the hair and the beard." In the eyes of researchers, that seemingly ordinary sentence hinting at the scourge of head lice is anything...

Professor Tracks Down Jewelry Stolen From King Tut's Tomb
After 100 Years, Stolen
King Tut Items Located
new study

After 100 Years, Stolen King Tut Items Located

Archaeologist who uncovered pharoah's tomb had a 'rather free and easy attitude'

(Newser) - Biographers say the British archaeologist who discovered the tomb of Pharaoh Tutankhamun a century ago this month dismissed talk of the "curse of King Tut's tomb" as superstitious "poppy-rot." That belief may have been backed up by the fact that he stole items from the pharaoh'...

Under a Turkish Church, an 'Extremely Important Discovery'

Tomb of St. Nicholas has reportedly been found in Demre

(Newser) - Santa Claus' last stop was southwest Turkey in the age of the Roman Empire. According to archaeologists in the region, the burial spot of St. Nicholas, the Christian saint whose generosity spawned the Father Christmas legend, has been found in the remains of a church in the town of Demre,...

Syria's 'Most Complete' Mosaic Ever Found Is Also the 'Rarest'

Huge Roman mosaic uncovered in Rastan is 'rare on a global scale'

(Newser) - A huge, intact Roman mosaic is being touted as the most significant archaeological find in a decade in Syria, already considered "an archaeologist's paradise," per AFP . The 1,600-year-old mosaic was found beneath a building in Rastan, a former rebel stronghold that saw intense fighting until its...

Hundreds of Skeletons Emerge Beneath Century-Old Store

They date to medieval period when Wales' Haverfordwest hosted a priory

(Newser) - Archaeologists have disturbed a medieval graveyard holding the remains of hundreds of people beneath a former department store in Wales. Old records and street names point to a medieval priory in Haverfordwest, Pembrokeshire, but no one knew for sure where it was when builders began digging new foundations beneath the...

1.8K-Year-Old Hercules Statue Unearthed From 'Small Rome'

Statue of the demigod unearthed in ancient Greek metropolis of Philippi

(Newser) - A larger-than-life statue of the mythical hero Hercules has been discovered hiding in the ancient Greek metropolis of Philippi, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Researchers with the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki uncovered the classical statue, dating back 1,800 years to the Roman period, during excavations on a main street...

In This Tiny Excavated Tooth Lie 'Enormous' Implications

1.8M-year-old tooth found in Caucasus region may be sign of oldest human settlement outside of Africa

(Newser) - Two decades ago, two fossilized, almost complete 1.8-million-year-old skulls belonging to prehistoric humans Zezva and Mzia were discovered in Dmanisi, a couple of hours from the Georgian capital of Tbilisi. Now, a new find that "cements the region as the home of one of the earliest prehistoric human...

Biologist's Curiosity About Elephants Leads to Big Find

Israeli archaeologists dig up 'largest complete fossil tusk found at prehistoric site in Israel'

(Newser) - Israeli archaeologists recently unearthed the titanic tusk of a prehistoric elephant near a kibbutz in southern Israel, a remnant of a behemoth once hunted by early people around half a million years ago. The Israel Antiquities Authority announced Wednesday that the 8-foot-long fossil belonging to the long-extinct straight-tusked elephant was...

Tree Ring Data May Have Solved Mystery of Missing Ship
Shipwreck's Story
'Is There in the Tree Rings'
new study

Shipwreck's Story 'Is There in the Tree Rings'

Tree ring data suggests it's the Dolphin, which was lost in 1859

(Newser) - "For me, the story is there in the tree rings." That's the takeaway of a dendrochronologist—an expert in dating events and artifacts from tree rings—who was part of a team that used tree ring data from a shipwreck found in Argentina in 2004 to determine...

Theory: Maya Rulers' Ashes Used to Make Pelota Balls

Archaeologist believes it happened in at least 3 cases

(Newser) - Pelota is one of the oldest known team sports, played centuries ago by the Maya—in some cases, with a ball that may have been partly made from the ashes of their dead rulers. The BBC reports on archaeologist Juan Yadeun Angulo's theory, which was born from a pair...

Scientists Uncover Remains of Hessian Troops From 1777

Forensic teams will try to identify German soldiers who fought in Revolutionary War

(Newser) - Researchers believe they have uncovered in a mass grave in New Jersey the remains of as many as 12 Hessian soldiers who fought during the Revolutionary War, officials announced Tuesday. The remains, found at the site of Fort Mercer and the 1777 Battle of Red Bank, rested for 245 years...

King Bluetooth Lies at Center of an Archaeological Dispute

Archaeologist and researcher say he was buried in Poland, but they don't agree on where

(Newser) - More than 1,000 years after his death in what's now Poland, a European king whose nickname lives on through wireless technology is at the center of an archaeological dispute. Chronicles from the Middle Ages say King Harald "Bluetooth" Gormsson of Denmark acquired his nickname courtesy of a...

At Famous Battle Site, an 'Incredibly Rare' Find

Complete skeleton of likely soldier found alongside horse bones near site of Waterloo

(Newser) - Finding human remains at the site of a famous battle isn't usually very surprising. But it is in the case of the Battle of Waterloo, which ended Napoleon's rule as emperor of France. Though up to 20,000 men died in the battle in modern-day Belgium on June...

First Dig at Legendary Arthur's Stone Begins

Archaeologists start excavating tomb linked by legend to King Arthur

(Newser) - Archaeologists in England have begun excavating a tomb thought to be more than 5,000 years old. While that in itself isn't too unusual in archaeological circles, this particular dig is attracting attention because it's taking place at what's known as Arthur's Stone, reports the Hereford ...

Divers Find Long-Lost Head of Hercules
Divers Make
Herculean Find
at Antikythera
Wreck
in case you missed it

Divers Make Herculean Find at Antikythera Wreck

Once giant boulders were removed, head of Hercules statue found in 1900 emerged

(Newser) - Marine archaeologists have better access to the world's richest ancient shipwreck after boulders were lifted from the Roman-era Antikythera wreck that yielded the famous Antikythera Mechanism calculator, revealing new treasures within. In addition to human teeth, the lead weight for an anchor, iron nails, and the base of a...

Frog Mystery Surfaces at Iron Age Settlement
Frog Mystery
Surfaces at
Iron Age
Settlement
new study

Frog Mystery Surfaces at Iron Age Settlement

Archaeologists can't explain their bones at ancient site

(Newser) - Excavations carried out ahead of highway work in England have revealed a mass grave full of … long-dead frogs. Experts are at a loss to explain the mass of 8,000 bones from roughly 350 frogs and toads, found buried in a long ditch beside an excavated roundhouse at Bar...

Humans Revered Chickens for Centuries Before Eating Them
Long Before Chickens Were
Dinners, They Were Our Pals
NEW STUDIES

Long Before Chickens Were Dinners, They Were Our Pals

These potential spiritual guides only became dinner about 2K years ago, research suggests

(Newser) - Chickens and humans have only been mingling for about 3,500 years, not as long as 10,000 years as previously believed, and for a good chunk of that time our feathered friends were revered, not eaten. That's according to new archaeological research which sees chickens as "actually...

Archaeologists Find 'Lost Civilization' in Bolivia

Discovery upends assumptions and demonstrates game-changing technology

(Newser) - When 16th-century Spanish missionaries first wandered into the tropical lowlands of modern Bolivia, they found a few scattered villages, and everyone since then assumed the area was too inhospitable to support large communities. The region has two harsh seasons, extremely dry and extremely wet, and the dense forest made exploration...

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