Newsweek Abruptly Fires Top Editors
Another editor stepped down in protest
By Rob Quinn,  Newser Staff
Posted Feb 6, 2018 1:56 AM CST
A copy of Newsweek is seen at Joe's Smoke in Portland, Maine.   (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
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(Newser) Newsweek is in the news again—and not for good reasons. The 85-year-old news magazine is engulfed in so much chaos and scandal that some staffers are wondering whether it will survive, according to USA Today. On Monday editor-in-chief Bob Roe, executive editor Ken Li, and reporter Celeste Katz were fired and other employees were sent home early, CNN reports. Political editor Matthew Cooper promptly resigned, praising Roe and Li for their efforts to pursue Newsweek's internal scandals. "I'm resigning from Newsweek at the end of business today, although perhaps that's moot since the staff has been sent home and the magazine, for all we know, doesn't exist," he said in a resignation letter posted on Twitter.

Katz had reported on recent problems at Newsweek, whose offices were raided by the Manhattan District Attorney's office last month as part of what she said was a long-running investigation into the company's finances. Newsweek Media co-owner and chairman Etienne Uzac stepped down after the raid, as did his wife, finance director Marian Kim, NBC reports. Katz had also reported on chief content officer Dayan Candappa, who was placed on leave last month after accusations of sexual harassment. "My warmest thanks to the brave Newsweek editors and colleagues who supported and shared in my work—especially our recent, difficult stories about the magazine itself—before my dismissal today," she tweeted Monday. (Newsweek brought back a print edition in 2014 after going online-only in 2012.)

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